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Giles Ellis, Schofield Watches

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Giles Ellis, Schofield Watches

Giles Ellis owner of Schofield Watch Company Limited. A man who, as he gets older finds it increasingly difficult to tolerate anything designed without thinking. These four items represent intelligently crafted and conscientious products typical to Swedish design; stripped of unnecessary ornamentation, fulfilling their roles elegantly.

Bo Madestrand, Salka Bornold & Anita Christiansen, FORM Magazine

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Bo Madestrand, Salka Bornold & Anita Christiansen, FORM Magazine

Form's editors, Bo Madestrand, Salka Hallström Bornold and Svensk Forms librarian, Anita Christiansen sat together to sculpt this guest collection, which lifts its inspiration from Swedens relationship with metals and ores. From copper and bronze, enjoying a welcome resurgence to silver and precious metals used in crafts, theres plenty to choose from in a collection full of charm, character and skill. Collectively, their collection goes under the simple moniker, "Metals".

Ewa Kumlin, CEO Svensk Form (Sweden)

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Ewa Kumlin, CEO Svensk Form (Sweden)

From high-tech to analogue, a selection from Svensk Forms CEO, Ewa Kumlin reflecting on our longing for the touch of the hand to be apparent in design. An attribute present in all these products by talented Swedish designers in a collection entitled: (By) The Touch of the Hand.

Anna Bellander, Helene Wallin-Hedström and Anneli Wardell, Svensk Form (Sweden)

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Anna Bellander, Helene Wallin-Hedström and Anneli Wardell, Svensk Form (Sweden)

Svensk Form, the Swedish Society for Crafts and Design the organisation has decades of design experience under its belt, with may of its staff boasting keen eyes for design and creativity. With that in mind, here is a collection from Svensk Forms Anna Bellander, Helene Wallin-Hedström and Anneli Wardell. Entitled, "Spring did Sprung", the collection is inspired by the season of growth.

Boris Vasić, FORM Magazine (Sweden)

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Boris Vasić, FORM Magazine (Sweden)

Everything we do has a political dimension: production, trade and consumption. In just this past year non-political events, such as the UFEA Euro 2012 or the Eurovision Song Contest, have become battle grounds for international politics and diplomacy. In Russia, a dance in a church has led to the imprisonment of three women. And, more seriously, the past years Arabic Spring has turned to civil war in Syria and political unrest in Egypt. What we often forget is that design and architecture also work in a global arena, marked by politics. What do we say to the Swedish architecture firm that has just opened shop in Russia, in the wake of Pussy Riot and the ongoing Russian rearment? Or to the Danish one that for years has the islamist Saudi goverment as client? And what do we say to all of the designers and companies that are producing their designs in undemocratic China (yes, it still is)? Here, I have chosen a couple of projects that in different ways react to political discussions and issues. Issues such as civil unrest, police surveillance, migration and religion are all represented in my selection "Political Form".

Claire Walsh, Stylus (UK)

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Claire Walsh, Stylus (UK)

Claire Walsh is a London-based editor at Stylus.com. She writes about lifestyle, design and travel, and her work has appeared in Elle Decoration, and online magazine SignhtUnseen.com. She is the author of the Wallpaper City Guide to Helsinki (Phaidon, 2010), and Interior of London Style(Editions de Paris, 2011). My selection encompasses the clean lines and unfussy silhouettes that Scandinavian design is famed for, but bucks the trend by including a few forms that are textural and jarring. Iconic mid-century designers those that put Scandinavia initially on the design map would temper rational forms, with a one-off piece, say hand-woven textiles, or a hand thrown-pot. The idea was to mix the ingenuity of mass production with the marvel of hand-made. These pieces prove that Scandinavian design is still exploring both routes with the same rigour and they can sit side-by-side in the home. It's a case of Swedish "Simplicity".

Sioban Imms, WGSN (UK)

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Sioban Imms, WGSN (UK)

A curated collection of items from Sioban Imms, materials editor at WGSN. Her picks have a distinct connection to materials under the label "In Materials".

David Carlson, David Report (Sweden)

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David Carlson, David Report (Sweden)

Design can play a more vital role than today, matter more by adding value and provide understanding in cultural, aesthetic, and in everyday terms. For me design must be relevant to the human condition, contribute to human activity, and have a value beyond its purchase price. Design that matter is design that move beyond mere style and shape to include experience, service, or participation. Design results in lasting value when it relates and is affective, tells a narrative, enhances our life style, and creates personal and cultural identity. The products in my selection, "Design Matters" reflects this view, in one way or the other.

Roseanna Roberts, Colour Trend Forecaster, (USA)

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Roseanna Roberts, Colour Trend Forecaster, (USA)

I chose these products because they stood out on their own merit as great, relevant examples of strong design. My decision was based on what they offer as concepts, be it visual entertainment, educational value, design relevance... So while it seems from the surface that the selection is random, they all tie together because they excel at what they are intended to do. They completely fulfil their specific key role. They're "Eye Catchers".

Johanna Björk, Goodlifer.com (USA)

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Johanna Björk, Goodlifer.com (USA)

One of the biggest global trends this year is black and white, in every kind of combination. Its the kind of elegant minimalism where Swedish design really excels a perfect expression of understated creativity and attention to detail. My collection is called, "Black & White".